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The Queen

Light Cutting and Collage by Chandra Brooks from her book: Beyaz Fare.
Light Cutting and Collage by Chandra Brooks from her book: Beyaz Fare.

The Queen is only referred to three times throughout Pourrat’s fairytale.  Initially, she isn’t even called The Queen, “There reigned a childless king and his wife”.  This isn’t necessarily sexist behavior on his part.  The origins of this tale are Medieval and depending on the kingdom, all references were to The King.  The King seems to be the prevailing ruler and The Queen is only referred to during transformations which gives the impression that metamorphosis is not possible without human males and females being present.  A queen holds significant power, but the threats to her power are dependent upon whether the society she rules in is matriarchal or patriarchal and how clear the succession to the throne will be.  In a modern democracy, this could be better understood by how a Democratic President’s control of the Senate and House of Representatives shifts according to the number of seats and votes held by The Republicans or Democrats.  A barren queen is always in a vulnerable place.  Depending upon the societies understanding and acceptance of medical wisdom, The Queen is often to blame for: the birth of children who cannot inherit the throne, as well as male infertility.  In a monarchy, The Queen’s job is to insure the succession of the throne by producing as many heirs as possible.  When Princesses are born, they are used to strengthen monastic ties at home as well as abroad by creating powerful allies through marriage.

Genevieve Pring as "The Queen" with The White Rat on her shoulder at a feast.  This collage consists of: a painting of my name "Chandra" & "Kupa" in Sanskrit (The Moon & The Well) and an medieval Arabic World Map.
Genevieve Pring as “The Queen” with The White Rat on her shoulder at a feast. This collage consists of: a painting of my name “Chandra” & “Kupa” in Sanskrit (The Moon & The Well) and an medieval Arabic World Map.